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SusannaG

SusannaG - Confessions of a Crazy Cat Lady

Just another GR refugee.  Other than that, I had a stroke in 2004, and read almost anything I can get my hands on, though I have a particular weakness for history, mystery, and historical fiction.

Currently reading

Trio for Blunt Instruments
Rex Stout
Progress: 20 %
A Rare Benedictine: The Advent of Brother Cadfael
Ellis Peters
The Hanover Square Affair
Ashley Gardner
Progress: 10 %
Medieval Tastes: Food, Cooking, and the Table (Arts and Traditions of the Table: Perspectives on Culinary History)
Beth Archer Brombert, Massimo Montanari
Progress: 10 %
Scars of Independence: America's Violent Birth
Holger Hoock
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind
Yuval Noah Harari Dr
Progress: 9 %
Elizabeth: The Forgotten Years
John Guy
Progress: 20/512 pages
Lady Cop Makes Trouble
Amy Stewart
The Hundred Years War, Volume 1: Trial by Battle
Jonathan Sumption
Progress: 166/586 pages
King Solomon's Mines
H. Rider Haggard
Progress: 4 %

Ian Mortimer's Time-Traveller's Guides

The Time Traveller's Guide to Elizabethan England - Ian Mortimer The Time Traveler's Guide to Medieval England: A Handbook for Visitors to the Fourteenth Century - Ian Mortimer

Ian Mortimer's "Time-Traveller's Guides" to medieval or Elizabethan England are both enjoyable and informative, and both are organized like travel guides: "what to see," "what to eat," etc.

 

I enjoyed all of the medieval guide, but was most fascinated by the chapter "what to wear."  I learned a great deal, including that this is possibly the only century in fashion history where men's styles of clothing changed more than women's.  Absolutely fascinating.

 

The Elizabethan guide gets off to a slightly slower start, but includes interesting material on the changing nature of "aspirational" house materials for the new middle class (chimneys at the start of the reign, window glass at the end).  It also features an aside I really enjoyed, that Sir Francis Drake's circumnavigation voyage was "not a pleasure cruise."

 

The medieval one is slightly better (I gave it 4.5 stars, compared to the Elizabethan's 4 stars), but they are both worth a read if you are interested in their respective periods.  Both include very nice picture inserts, too.  I should think both would be useful to historical novelists, as well.