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SusannaG

SusannaG - Confessions of a Crazy Cat Lady

Just another GR refugee.  Other than that, I had a stroke in 2004, and read almost anything I can get my hands on, though I have a particular weakness for history, mystery, and historical fiction.

Currently reading

Scars of Independence: America's Violent Birth
Holger Hoock
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind
Yuval Noah Harari Dr
Progress: 9 %
Elizabeth: The Forgotten Years
John Guy
Progress: 20/512 pages
Lady Cop Makes Trouble
Amy Stewart
The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt's New World
Andrea Wulf
Progress: 2 %
The Hundred Years War, Volume 1: Trial by Battle
Jonathan Sumption
Progress: 166/586 pages
King Solomon's Mines
H. Rider Haggard
Progress: 4 %
Queen's Gambit: A Novel
Elizabeth Fremantle
Progress: 22 %
1913: The Eve of War
Paul Ham
Progress: 20 %
The William Shakespeare Detective Agency: The Dark Lady (The William Shakespeare Detective Agency Book 2)
Colin Falconer
Progress: 15 %

Elizabeth of York, by Alison Weir

Elizabeth of York: A Tudor Queen and Her World - Alison Weir

Elizabeth of York is well placed to be important and interesting in English history - first child of Edward IV and Elizabeth "was her mother really a witch?" Wydeville*, elder sister of the Princes in the Tower, niece (and courting partner?) of Richard III, wife of Henry VII, mother of Henry VIII, and the sprig from which all future British rulers would descend.  But Weir confronted a problem in writing her biography - there isn't that much surviving evidence about Elizabeth herself, as compared to the men surrounding her. 

 

So this biography is also "And her World," which makes a great deal of sense.  (It is the same tactic she took with her biography of Eleanor of Aquitaine, for similar reasons.)

 

Weir recovers some ground from her Princes in the Tower, and covers it slightly differently, but Ricardians will still not like that Richard is clearly the bad guy.  (For the record, I am not a Ricardian.)  She also addresses the interesting question of - was Richard courting his niece?  And before his wife was actually dead?  Did Elizabeth write a letter to him egging him on?  What's going on with that

 

I found the material from before her marriage to Henry Tudor the most interesting part, though I enjoyed all of it.

 

Recommended to those interested in the Tudors or the Wars of the Roses.

 

*This spelling, "Wydeville" rather than "Woodville," is the spelling Weir uses consistently in this book. 

 

Thanks to NetGallery for the ARC - much appreciated!